Can I steer the conversation to a topic about which I am more comfortable?

Let’s look more closely at the word “comfortable” in this question. The ASLPI Evaluators proceed through rigorous training which includes intensive focus on types of questions appropriate for language testing purposes. Sensitive topics are not included in the evaluation. The question above appears to be referring to topics that are not familiar, which in turn might equate to “discomfort” if you have limited vocabulary and limited language use. Don’t let unfamiliarity make you uncomfortable. Use the language features in your repertoire to gain an understanding about the topic and then respond from a personal perspective on the topic. We talk about a wide range of topics daily, many not totally familiar. Increased comfort with topics goes hand in hand with having a wide and flexible range of language features that move us through conversations and discussions.

The purpose of the ASLPI is not to simply touch on topics with which you are comfortable and have familiarity (previously signed about them). That would plateau your language proficiency level. The purpose of the ASLPI is to measure your maximum overall proficiency. Proficient users can use language with accuracy, complexity and flexibility across topics. For unfamiliar topics, use language strategies such as, “That is an interesting question. I am not familiar with that, but if I had to deal with that situation, I would ….”. The ASLPI is not evaluating your knowledge on any topic. The attempt to answer the question with an array of language features and increasing complexity and consistency raises the language proficiency level.

The evaluator probes into linguistic areas through familiar and less familiar topics to identify both the maximum skills (ceiling) and limits (floor) of the examinee's ability.

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Gallaudet

800 Florida Avenue NE
Washington, DC 20002

Gallaudet

800 Florida Avenue NE
Washington, DC 20002